Lake Ontario Real Estate Sales Take Off

Provided by Michael Thaxton

Approximately 40 million people move annually. This year, a growing number of Americans have their sights set on Lake Ontario real estate, The Democrat & Chronicle reports. “The lakefront real estate market is back since the recession eased,” real estate expert Bob Blain explains. “This year buyers are looking at the west side of Lake Ontario for values.”
Although the properties appeal to individuals and families from all different backgrounds, Blain admits that they are particularly popular with couples whose children recently left for college. The waterfront is the ideal place to relax alone as a couple — or to entertain, The Democrat & Chronicle explains. Moreover, would-be property owners are likely to snag the best deals in the Lake Ontario and Irondequoit Bay areas. The waters are only somewhat choppier, and the cottages and waterfront properties are significantly cheaper than comparable houses on The Finger Lakes, especially those located on or near Canandaigua Lake.

Despite what many believe, prices are not necessarily determined by the size of cottages or homes. Instead, homes are priced based on their proximity to the lake. “Buyers tend to prefer homes on lake level versus ones that are perched up high,” The Democrat & Chronicle continues.

Why You Should Never Purchase a Home Without a Home Inspection

Provided by

Michael Thaxton

Summer is the perfect time of year to consider buying a new home. However, the process of finding the right house for you isn’t always that simple, and you might end up looking at several homes before making your final choice.
Even when you have found the house you want to buy, it’s essential that you have a home inspection done before making your down payment, according to a June 7 Daily News Journal article.

Home inspections are usually standard when it comes to the closing process of buying a house. Even if you have reasons to want to skip the step of a home inspection, you should never leave it out of the home-buying process.

According to the Daily News Journal, it is important to have a home inspection so you can be more informed about the house you plan to buy, and protected from buying a house with major problems that the seller hasn’t told you about.

Your home inspector will provide you with a number of different pieces of information about your prospective house. Home inspectors evaluate the house’s physical condition, construction and mechanical systems, the Daily News Journal reports.

“(A home inspection) methodically identifies items that need repaired or replaced,” the article says. “Well-prepared reports estimate the remaining life of the major systems, equipment, structure and finishes.”

A home should be priced fairly according to its condition and state of repair. And if you aren’t prepared to conduct the extensive repairs a home inspection reveals are necessary, you might want to look into buying a newer dwelling instead.

Home inspections shouldn’t be looked at as a nuisance or an unwanted obligation as you move through the home-buying process. Home inspectors can help you determine if your perfect house is really all that it seems at a first glance.

Local Businesses Continue to Aid in Camp Good Days Cleanup

Despite being devastated by flooding in last month’s severe storm that caused damage around Yates County, Branchport, N.Y.’s Camp Good Days is continuing to see an outpouring of support from the surrounding Western New York and Finger Lakes region communities.
Just a week after severe thunderstorms rolled across the area, local companies and businesses offered their help to Camp Good Days, a free, week-long summer camp for children with cancer and other life-threatening diseases, according to a 13 WHAM News article.

The thunderstorms of mid-May caused about $350,000 in damage to Camp Good Days, according to Buffalo’s WIVB News 4. Several buildings were flooded and the camp’s infrastructure was ruined during the storm.

One company that offered its support was Comprehensive Mold Management, 13 WHAM News reported. Comprehensive Mold Management specializes in the removal of mold, which had begun to grow in the buildings because of the water damage that took place.

According to This Old House, about 60% of homes in the U.S. have wet basements; 38% of these homes are at risk of mold growth as a result. Mold and mildew can be extremely hazardous to the health of both humans and animals, especially those with respiratory diseases like asthma.

Paul Wagner, president of Comprehensive Mold Management, cited his concerns for the health of the children who attend Camp Good Days as a reason for sending his workers to aid in cleanup.

“We knew they were going to need a lot of help,” Wagner told 13 WHAM News. “My big concern was the kids coming back down here with compromised immune systems were going to be an issue, because we don’t want them getting sick because they already have compromised immune systems.”

Hundreds of volunteers continue to help the camp clean-up effort.

Camp Good Days will need to be rebuilt by the time it was scheduled to reopen for 200 children and their families on June 28, according to WIVB News 4. Staff training will start on June 23. With the camp’s limited budget and the amount of damage still present, it remains to be seen if the rebuilding effort will be successful.

“Successful Relationships for Housing for Homeless Households and Social Services Clients”

Education Offering:

“Successful Relationships for Housing for Homeless Households and Social Services Clients”

The Rapid Rehousing Partnership, a collaborative program of Coordinated Care Services, Inc., The Monroe County Department of Human Services, Alternatives for Battered Women, Spirtus Christi Prison Outreach, The Center for Youth Services, the YWCA, Wilson Commencement Park and The Housing Council at Pathstone, is pleased to announce the availability of a new, free educational workshop for landlords and property managers, “Successful Relationships for Housing for Homeless Households and Social Services Clients”. The first offering of this workshop is scheduled for:

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

8:00 – 9:30 AM

at

The Housing Council at Pathstone

75 College Avenue, United Way Conference Room 1

As part of the community’s efforts to eliminate homelessness, a Rapid Rehousing approach is being used more and more to quickly move households from homelessness to stable permanent housing. The Rapid Rehousing Partnership Program provides the needed support for both the households moving into permanent housing and the landlords who are renting units for our clients. This new workshop offering is aimed at providing landlords and property managers with the information needed to have positive working relationships and experiences with the Department of Human Services, our Rapid Rehousing Program and their tenants.

Topics to be included in this workshop are:

Rapid Rehousing Supports for Landlords and Tenants

Renting to Temporary Assistance Clients

Landlord Statements

Direct Rent Payments

Property Violations

The Landlord Tenant Security Agreement and Improvements in Claims Process

Participation in the session is limited to 25 participants. Additional offering of this workshop will be scheduled on a regular basis. To register for the June 25th session, please complete the REGISTRATION-FORM-06-25-14 form and return via fax or e-mail to:

Michele Doherty:

E-mail: mdoherty@ccsi.org

Fax: 585-328-5211

The newly revised DHS Publication is available by clicking here, “Renting to Monroe County Temporary Assistance Clients – 2014”.

Thank you and we hope that you will be able to attend this Educational Workshop!

Families deserve housing options Essay

Democrat and Chronicle

Essay:

Families deserve housing options

by

Monica McCullough

Home matters.

Your choice of where to live is one of the most important decisions you make to determine your family’s quality of life.

Deciding what school district your children will attend, what neighborhood in which you will invest, and what house you will call home is a rite of passage for families that sets the course of their future.

Unfortunately this important choice is often unavailable to members of our community who live in poverty. In the city of Rochester, poverty is concentrated at a level higher than anywhere else in New York state. Our community, valued for its high quality of life, revolves around a hidden urban core that houses so many people struggling to make ends meet that we have become the fifth poorest city in the United States. The simplest opportunity available to families to escape this oppressing environment — the choice to live somewhere else — is severely limited by the lack of affordable housing for families that is located in the suburbs of Monroe County.

more…

“Successful Relationships for Housing for Homeless Households and Social Services Clients”

WORKSHOP IS FULL, LOOK FOR UPDATES FOR THE NEXT AVAILABLE WORKSHOP SOON!

Education Offering:

“Successful Relationships for Housing for Homeless Households and Social Services Clients”

The Rapid Rehousing Partnership, a collaborative program of Coordinated Care Services, Inc., The Monroe County Department of Human Services, Alternatives for Battered Women, Spirtus Christi Prison Outreach, The Center for Youth Services and The Housing Council at Pathstone, is pleased to announce the availability of a new, free educational workshop for landlords and property managers, “Successful Relationships for Housing for Homeless Households and Social Services Clients”.  The first offering of this workshop is scheduled for:

Wednesday, May 7th, 2014

8:00 – 9:30 AM

at

The Housing Council at Pathstone

75 College Avenue, Eastman Room

As part of the community’s efforts to eliminate homelessness, a Rapid Rehousing approach is being used more and more to quickly move households from homelessness to stable permanent housing. The Rapid Rehousing Partnership Program provides the needed support for both the households moving into permanent housing and the landlords who are renting units for our clients. This new workshop offering is aimed at providing landlords and property managers with the information needed to have positive working relationships and experiences with the Department of Human Services, our Rapid Rehousing Program and their tenants.

Topics to be included in this workshop are:

Rapid Rehousing Supports for Landlords and Tenants

Renting to Temporary Assistance Clients

Landlord Statements

Direct Rent Payments

Property Violations

The Landlord Tenant Security Agreement and Improvements in Claims Process

Participation in the session is limited to 25 participants. Additional offering of this workshop will be scheduled on a regular basis. To register for the May 7th session, please complete the registration form and return via fax or e-mail to:

Michele Doherty:

E-mail: mdoherty@ccsi.org

Fax: 585-328-5211

The newly revised DHS Publication is available by clicking here, “Renting to Monroe County Temporary Assistance Clients – 2014”.

Thank you and we hope that you will be able to attend this Educational Workshop!

Reilich: Crack down on absentee landlords

Reilich: Crack down on absentee landlords by Meaghan M. McDermott

Marking his first 100 days on the job by delivering his first address as Greece town supervisor, Bill Reilich pledged a crackdown on absentee landlords — particularly in the Dewey Avenue/Stone Road area — and promised a new municipal court that will only handle code violations.

Reilich, who took office in January after a decade in the state Assembly, spoke to members of the Greece Chamber of Commerce at a luncheon at Ridgemont Country Club.

He said the rental property initiative stemmed from concerns raised by residents in the town’s older section, where ill-maintained rental properties threaten to destabilize neighborhoods and lower property values.

Houses are good values there, many with selling prices under $100,000, and being purchased by investors often from out-of-state, he said.

“But the problem is the landlords are a million miles away and don’t know what’s going on in the home, but the neighbors do,” he said. Renters move next to long-time owner-occupied homes and “sometimes the individual living there leaves cars on the front lawn, or the lawn’s growing high or the home needs paint and the homeowner who’s been there for 40 years says ‘I’m sick of this,’ moves away and their home becomes rental and on and on down the street.”

Details of that plan will be hashed out in coming weeks, but would likely include town inspections every three years to ensure the properties are up to code before they can be certified as habitable.

Carole Messina-Provost, with the neighborhood association Dewey Corridor Neighbors, applauded the move.

“I give the town a standing ovation,” she said. “For them to do this is being very proactive. A plan where they will do inspections of homes is fantastic and I think it will encourage people to know that if they buy a house and plan on making it a rental, they are going to have consequences if they don’t keep it up.”

In his speech, Reilich also noted that the state of business development in town is strong, and said he anticipates as many as three new car dealerships along West Ridge Road in coming months.

Also part of Reilich’s upcoming agenda is a new Police Department headquarters on the town hall campus on Vince Tofany Boulevard. The department now runs out of a converted waste water treatment plant on Island Cottage Road that is too small and inadequate for the needs of a 21st Century police force, Reilich said. Funding for that project would be freed up in 2016 when the town finishes paying off its bonds for building town hall.

Additionally, the department will soon be adopting a more formalized uniform and going back to black and white police cars. Charcoal gray patrol vehicles were rolled out in 2012.

As for his campaign pledges to make the town’s parks nicer, Reilich said crews are already working to clear brush and construct new restrooms in Badgerow Park South, and that residents will soon have a lodge facility in Braddock Bay park that rivals newly-constructed lodges in nearby county-owned parks.

“There should be no reason for residents to have to go out of our town for these kinds of facilities,” he said.

Although he didn’t give details on where the parcel of land is, Reilich said town officials are in negotiations for a property that would become a new town park on Lake Ontario, giving residents access to the water.

And, he promised a “major announcement” coming up on Monday morning, but was mum on details.

“A lot of things are going on in a very short time,” he said.

MCDERMOT@DemocratandChronicle.com

Twitter.com/meagmc

Fair Housing is Your Right: Use It!

HUD MARKS FAIR HOUSING MONTH

WASHINGTON – Each April, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) uses Fair Housing Month to mark the passage of the 1968 Fair Housing Act, the landmark law passed shortly after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. which prohibits housing discrimination based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, and family status. This year’s Fair Housing Month theme is “Fair Housing is Your Right: Use It!” Throughout the month, HUD will cast a spotlight on the persistent problem that exists in this country, as individuals and families continue to face both blatant and subtle forms of housing discrimination.

HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan launched this year’s commemoration at an event featuring the new film “A Matter of Place,” which documents three personal stories of housing discrimination in New York City. Underwritten by a grant provided under HUD’s Fair Housing Initiative Program, the film profiles three examples of housing discrimination based on race, sexual orientation, and source of income and features commentary from legal experts, civil rights advocates and fair housing testers.

“This month is an opportunity to recommit to the principle that fair housing is an essential part of everything we do; every grant we make; every building we build; and every community we work with,” said HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan. “And we will go to the mat in order to ensure the right of every American to fair housing. Although the times have changed – our commitment to this work remains as strong as ever. It is at the core of our mission.”

“Fair Housing Month is an opportunity for all of us to reflect on just how far we’ve come to make our housing more equitable and how far we still have to go to end housing discrimination,” said HUD Acting FHEO Assistant Secretary Bryan Greene. “Fair housing is about giving people the opportunity to pursue their dreams and whenever this opportunity is denied, not only do families lose, our entire nation loses.”

Each year, HUD and communities and organizations across the country recognize Fair Housing Month by hosting an array of activities that enhance the public’s awareness of their fair housing rights and promote the nation’s commitment to end housing discrimination.

In addition to the legal protections provided under the Fair Housing Act prohibiting housing discrimination based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, and family status, approximately 20 states, the District of Columbia, and more than 150 cities, towns and counties across the nation also prohibit discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals and families. In 2012, HUD published new regulations to ensure that the Department’s core housing programs are open to all eligible persons, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity. In addition, 12 states and the District of Columbia, as well as several counties and municipalities protect persons against housing discrimination based on their source of income.

 

NEW LEAD POISONING PREVENTION BROCHURES AVAILABLE IN SEVEN LANGUAGES

ROCHESTER, N.Y. – The Coalition to Prevent Lead Poisoning (CPLP) is pleased to announce that it has 41,000 brochures in seven languages – Burmese, English, Karen, Nepali, Somali, Spanish, and Swahili –now available for distribution.

 

In 2008, CPLP worked with the Ad Council of Rochester and Roberts Communications to design a visually arresting brochure containing lead poisoning prevention resource information. Originally available in English and Spanish, the brochure provided information about how to get a home inspected, getting children tested at one and two, Lead Safe Work Practices classes, finding funding to help with cleaning up lead hazards, as well as contact information for local and national resources. Over the years, generous funders (including the City of Rochester and the Greater Rochester Health Foundation) have supported revisions and reprints of this educational resource.

 

The new brochures have been updated and reflect the growing needs of the community. Aside from encouraging anyone who lives in a pre-1978 home to get it inspected for lead hazards and, in accordance with New York State law, get every child tested for lead exposure at ages one and again at two, the brochures include the following new information:

                • As of 2013, the Monroe County Department of Public Health will do a home inspection for any child who has a blood lead test result of 8 ug/dL or higher. If a child lives in the City of Rochester, is under 6 years old, and had a blood lead test result between 5-7 ug/dL, a parent/caregiver can request a home investigation by calling the County Health Dept. at (585) 753-5087.

                • If you are a renter, you cannot be evicted for requesting a lead inspection of your home. Contact information for Legal Assistance of Western New York, Inc. has been included in the 2014 revision.

 

CPLP wishes to extend a very special thank you to its expert translation team, Ernest Kiptoo, Ranga Khatiwada-Sharma, Abdulrahman Behi, Day Day Stone, Eh Moo Paw, Jennifer Pincus at the Rochester General Medical Group Office of Community Medicine, and Luisa Baars of Mas Translations. Grateful thanks also goes to the Ad Council of Rochester and the talented team at Roberts Communications.

 

Funding for this project was provided by the City of Rochester through a grant from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The HUD Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control promotes local efforts to eliminate dangerous lead hazards from lower income homes; stimulates private sector investment in lead hazard control; and educates the public about the dangers of lead-based paint.

 

 

The brochures are FREE and available to anyone who would like copies to share with clients, family, friends, and community members. Call (585) 224-3125 to arrange a pick up time.  For quick distribution, you can download PDFs of the brochures from the Coalition’s website at www.letsmakeleadhistory.org.

New Date Added…FREE “Successful Relationships for Housing for Homeless Households and Social Services Clients” Workshop

NEW DATE JUST ADDED!

Education Offering:

“Successful Relationships for Housing for Homeless Households and Social Services Clients”

The Rapid Rehousing Partnership, a collaborative program of Coordinated Care Services, Inc., The Monroe County Department of Human Services, Alternatives for Battered Women, Spirtus Christi Prison Outreach, The Center for Youth Services and The Housing Council at Pathstone, is pleased to announce the availability of a new, free educational workshop for landlords and property managers, “Successful Relationships for Housing for Homeless Households and Social Services Clients”.  The first offering of this workshop is scheduled for:

Wednesday, March 26th

8:00 – 9:30 AM

at

The Housing Council at Pathstone

75 College Avenue, Eastman Room

As part of the community’s efforts to eliminate homelessness, a Rapid Rehousing approach is being used more and more to quickly move households from homelessness to stable permanent housing. The Rapid Rehousing Partnership Program provides the needed support for both the households moving into permanent housing and the landlords who are renting units for our clients. This new workshop offering is aimed at providing landlords and property managers with the information needed to have positive working relationships and experiences with the Department of Human Services, our Rapid Rehousing Program and their tenants.

Topics to be included in this workshop are:

Rapid Rehousing Supports for Landlords and Tenants

Renting to Temporary Assistance Clients

Landlord Statements

Direct Rent Payments

Property Violations

The Landlord Tenant Security Agreement and Improvements in Claims Process

Participation in the session is limited to 25 participants. Additional offering of this workshop will be scheduled on a regular basis. To register for the March 26th session, please complete the registration form and return via fax or e-mail to:

Michele Doherty:

E-mail: mdoherty@ccsi.org

Fax: 585-328-5211

The newly revised DHS Publication is available by clicking here, “Renting to Monroe County Temporary Assistance Clients – 2014”.

Thank you and we hope that you will be able to attend this Educational Workshop!